a fancy place

observations, ramblings, notations
artmastered:

Newspaper and Fruit Dish by Juan Gris, 1916. Gris has used subtle patterns and repetition of shape to create the illusion of texture in this still life.

artmastered:

Newspaper and Fruit Dish by Juan Gris, 1916. Gris has used subtle patterns and repetition of shape to create the illusion of texture in this still life.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Baby’s bony body
Newborns are a bundle of bones – more than 300 to be more precise. Over time, many of these bones fuse together. One obvious example: The 44 original, separate components of the skull, whose loose confederation allows a newborn’s head to more easily pass through the birth canal and to accommodate dramatic brain and head growth during in the first year of life outside the womb. Generally, an infant’s skull fuses together by age two to provide better protection of the brain.
Overall, the total number of bones in the body is reduced to 206 by the time humans reach adulthood.
Above is a human fetus visualized in the third trimester of pregnancy using a computed tomographic scan and volume rendering software. Courtesy of Philipp Gunz and Jean-Jacques Hublin at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Baby’s bony body

Newborns are a bundle of bones – more than 300 to be more precise. Over time, many of these bones fuse together. One obvious example: The 44 original, separate components of the skull, whose loose confederation allows a newborn’s head to more easily pass through the birth canal and to accommodate dramatic brain and head growth during in the first year of life outside the womb. Generally, an infant’s skull fuses together by age two to provide better protection of the brain.

Overall, the total number of bones in the body is reduced to 206 by the time humans reach adulthood.

Above is a human fetus visualized in the third trimester of pregnancy using a computed tomographic scan and volume rendering software. Courtesy of Philipp Gunz and Jean-Jacques Hublin at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany.

(via scientificillustration)

tinywaitress:

The titles of Marie Antoinette from her birth to her death, with a portrait painted of her during each of those times.

  • 2 November 1755 – 19 April 1770: Her Royal Highness Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria
  • 19 April 1770 – 10 May 1774: Her Royal Highness The Dauphine of France
  • 10 May 1774 – 1 October 1791: Her Majesty The Queen of France and Navarre
  • 1 October 1791 – 21 September 1792: Her Majesty The Queen of the French
  • 21 September 1792 - 21 January 1793: Madame Capet
  • 21 January 1793 – 16 October 1793: La Veuve (“the widow”) Capet

(via vivelareine)

vivelareine:

Marie Antoinette on her sisters-in-law, the comtesse d’Artois and Provence, in a letter to her mother dated June 13, 1776:

The comtesse d’Artois has a great advantage, that of having children; but that is perhaps the only reason why anyone ever thinks about her, and it is not my fault if I do not have that same merit. As for [the comtesse de Provence], she is more intelligent, but I wouldn’t exchange my reputation for hers…

myvintagevogue:

Harper’s Bazaar August 1949 - Photo by Louise Dahl-Wolfe

myvintagevogue:

Harper’s Bazaar August 1949 - Photo by Louise Dahl-Wolfe

fckyeaharthistory:

Shen Nanpin (Shen Quan) - Cranes, Peach Tree, and Chinese Roses. Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk

Both cranes and peaches are symbolic of longevity because of their association with immortals: the crane is often shown carrying an immortal on its back, and mythical peaches of immortality grow in the orchard of Xiwangmu, the queen mother of the west. The cranes and peaches thus evoke an isle of the immortals—perhaps Penglai, an auspicious paradise frequently depicted throughout East Asia. In 1731 the Chinese artist Shen Nanpin went to Nagasaki to teach Japanese students the traditional Chinese style of realistic painting, resulting in the formation of the Nagasaki school. Even after Nanpin returned to China, many works in his style continued to be imported into Japan, influencing Japanese painting into the late Edo period.

fckyeaharthistory:

Shen Nanpin (Shen Quan) - Cranes, Peach Tree, and Chinese Roses. Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk

Both cranes and peaches are symbolic of longevity because of their association with immortals: the crane is often shown carrying an immortal on its back, and mythical peaches of immortality grow in the orchard of Xiwangmu, the queen mother of the west. The cranes and peaches thus evoke an isle of the immortals—perhaps Penglai, an auspicious paradise frequently depicted throughout East Asia. 

In 1731 the Chinese artist Shen Nanpin went to Nagasaki to teach Japanese students the traditional Chinese style of realistic painting, resulting in the formation of the Nagasaki school. Even after Nanpin returned to China, many works in his style continued to be imported into Japan, influencing Japanese painting into the late Edo period.

(via artpedia)

dailyfossil:

Europasaurus

Reconstruction by Gerhard Boeggemann

When: Jurassic (~ 156 - 151 million years ago)

Where: Germany

What: Europasaurus is the smallest sauropod known. Now remember I said smallest SAUROPOD known, so we are still looking at an animal that was about 20 feet (~6 meters) long. Keep in mind though, this includes the long neck and tail - taking those out of the picture and the animal’s body length was about 6.5 feet (~ 2 meters).  This length, coupled with the shoulder height of Europasaurus ( about 5 feet [~1.5 meters]), gives us a sauropod with a body that was about the size of a modern elephant.  There are a number of proposed tiny sauropods out there, but I have selected Europasaurus as it is known from several almost complete skeletons, from juveniles to adults, so we can be sure this is not just a baby sauropod that would have grown much larger. Above I have included a diagram from the original description of Europasaurus rather than a reconstructed mounted skeleton to show you just how much of the skeleton is known. Why is Europasaurus so small? Its our good friend Island Dwarfism back again! The specimens have been found in Germany, on what would have been one of many islands in the area during the late Jurassic, owing to the higher sea levels. 

This smallest of all sauropods is in the clade  Macranaria within the sauropod family tree. This group actually contains some of the biggest sauropods (and thus dinosuars) ever known! Talk about some size diversity within a group! An adult Europasaurus could have easily walked between the legs of some of its larger cousins. The great range of ages in the recovered specimens of Europasaurus have allowed for detailed study of the microstructure of the bones, revealing how these animals grew. From this study it has been proposed that Europasaurus  managed to stay small on its restricted island habitat by not stopping its growth exceptionally earlier than its relatives, but instead by dramatically slowing down its growth rate. 

I hope this cute little sauropod makes up for ruining all of those childhoods with the reality (or should I say unreality) of Brontosaurus a few posts ago. ;) 

(via scientificillustration)